PowerShell to Configure BizTalk Server 2013 Host and Host Instances

Everyone loves automated processes.

With BizTalk 2013 if you want to provide a repeatable install; you need automation. PowerShell is where it’s at.
Lucky for me, other very skilled people already have written PowerShell scripts providing the capability to create hosts and host instances. Sandro Pereira has written and published a PowerShell script to create your BizTalk host instances based upon the best practice of host separation. However, it’s only written for BizTalk 2010.

I’ve gone and modified it for BizTalk 2013. It provides the exact same capability, with BizTalk 2013 capabilities.
This includes new Receive Port Handlers:

  • SB-Messaging
  • SFTP
  • WCF-BasicHttpRelay
  • WCF-NetTcpRelay

And New Send Port Handlers:

  • SB-Messaging
  • SFTP
  • WCF-BasicHttpRelay
  • WCF-NetTcpRelay
  • WCF-WebHttp (the new adapter supporting REST)

The diff to the BTS2010 version from Sandro is:

You can grab my updated BizTalk 2013 script over at my BizTalk 2013 GitHub repository.

End of Microsoft Development?

It has been a year from not blogging at all, due to a hectic professional schedule.

I’ve been busy dealing with BizTalk 2010, WCF services and all things SOA. One thing I’ve learnt is I’m not a hardcore developer. I’m much better at implementing technical solutions and server sysadmin. I think I’ll stick to that. In the meantime my knowledge and skill level with BizTalk has gone up now having almost 2 years experience developing, deploying and maintaining an ESB based around BizTalk 2010 and WCF services. It will be good to get back to Unix systems and Git source control instead of Wintel systems with TFS.

Microsoft Development

I’ve started down the path of Darkness :-)

In December 2011, I went on BizTalk training with @BizTalkBill and I’m now four weeks into the next stage of my career which is being an Microsoft “Integration Specialist”. You won’t find any open source in this realm, no ruby, nothing involving indie developers cracking out code until late at night.

What this change means is getting to know Visual Studio, BizTalk, SQL Server and all things Microsoft. It means using TFS, even though you really want to use Git. It means C# coding when you are familiar with interpreted languages like Perl, PHP and Ruby (I won’t be doing an ASP work).

That means you can expect going forward less posts about Unix, Clearcase (finally!) and Open Source platforms, and more about Microsoft offerings; specifically integration products.

Welcome to 2012.

Technical analysis of various topics